June 24, 2024

Stacey’s PhD journey continues

PhD tauira including; Tom Johnson, Stacey Ruru, Aneta Cram and Kiri Parata
Stacey’s PhD journey continues
PhD tauira including; Tom Johnson, Stacey Ruru, Aneta Cram and Kiri Parata

One year further into my PhD, there are some key learnings and self-reflections that I have come to notice about my research journey. [https://kia-puawai.whakauae.co.nz/latest-news/health-research-council-maori-health-phd-scholarship-awarded-to-stacey-ruru].  

My PhD explores the experiences of leadership and mentoring by wāhine rangatira. For the last 12 months, I have been conducting interviews with wāhine and analysing the gathered data. Wāhine within my study were from a range of areas including, academia, health, kaupapa Māori, media, and art.  

Pūrākau highlighted whānau as a positive influence and source of mātauranga that was passed down to these wāhine. Wāhine acknowledged many tuākana throughout their lives including previous kaiako and coaches from school; kaumātua and kuia from their marae; and wāhine from their respective organisations. Tuākana provided manaakitanga, tautoko and aroha in their own unique ways.

Reflecting on my research learning journey so far, I have had to learn to trust in the kaupapa and persevere in my mahi rangahau. Research is not a straight pathway; it involves time, processes, decisions, and adjusting as necessary. Self-reflection is a key part of the journey and I highly encourage future tauira to do so.

I appreciate the engagement opportunities such as writing retreats provided by Whakauae. Being in a kaupapa Māori organisation with like-minded people committed to Māori health development and well-being maintains my waiora.

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